Feline Comprehensive Yearly Visit

At Marietta Animal Hospital, our comprehensive yearly visit for felines includes a complete physical exam with history, intestinal parasite check, and appropriate vaccinations based on your pets age and health. Wellness testing is also offered during this visit (for more info on wellness testing click here). We will offer heartworm checks for all indoor and outdoor felines, although, it is not required, in order to begin heartworm preventive. We do advise that all felines that go outside be tested yearly for FELV/ FIV (feline leukemia/ feline immunodeficiency virus), regardless of vaccination status, since no vaccine is one hundred percent effective. Felines who go outside at any time should be vaccinated for FELV and cats who spend a majority of time outside should be vaccinated also for FIV and be microchipped. Many felines receive yearly vaccinations for Rabies, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Panleukopenia, Calcivirus, and Virulent Systemic Feline Calcivirus. However three year vaccinations are also available for adult, healthy, indoor only felines. Our staff can discuss your options with you, if you are considering making a transition. We will also take this opportunity to address heartworm preventive, flea and tick products, shampoos, and diet with you.


Feline Rhinotracheitis/ Feline Herpes– a viral infection in felines characterized by sneezing, fever, inflammation of the nose and eyes and possible corneal damage. Some felines may have no symptoms, but carry the virus and can transmit it to other felines.

Risk factors: Multiple felines with crowding, coexisting disease to suppress immune system, kittens born to carrier moms.


Feline Panleukopenia a viral infection in felines characterized by depression, vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. Changes are often sudden and can mimic poisoning.

Risk factors: Contaminated environment, including carriers, floors, food and water dishes. Multiple felines with crowding, coexisting disease to suppress immune system.


Feline Calicivirus– a common viral infection in felines characterized by upper respiratory symptoms, ulcers in the mouth, pneumonia, and occasional arthritis.

*A more severe form is called virulent systemic feline calicivirus (vs-fcv) and may include liver and kidney damage and generalized bleeding. It has a high mortality rate and is highly contagious and resistant to many disinfectants.

Risk factors: Multiple felines, coexisting disease to suppress immune system, and contaminated environment including carriers, floors, food and water dishes.


Feline Leukemia is a viral infection in felines that reduces the normal immune response and predisposes the development of tumors and is associated with reoccurring respiratory and gastric intestinal symptoms, inflammation of gums and mouth and fever.

Risk factors: Felines allowed outside, multiple feline households, close casual contact (grooming, shared dishes, and litter pans).


Feline Immunodeficiency Virus is a viral infection in felines that reduces the normal immune response and is associated with reoccurring respiratory and gastric intestinal symptoms, inflammation of gums and mouth, and fever. Symptoms may occur over months to years after infection.

Risk factors: Felines allowed outside, and occasional transmission at time of birth.

*Current FIV test cannot determine between a vaccinated feline and a FIV infected feline, therefore FIV vaccinated felines should be tattooed or microchipped for permanent identification.


Heartworms are a parasite spread by mosquitoes, that migrate to the heart and blood vessels of the lungs. Common symptoms include coughing, vomiting, chronic breathing abnormalities and occasional sudden death.

Risk factors: Living in heartworm endemic (high incidence) areas. 

*Indoor and outdoor felines are at risk.


Intestinal parasites commonly seen include whipworms, hookworms, roundworms, coccidia, giardia, and tapeworms. Many have the potential to be zoonotic (transmission from animals to people).